Black Kale

As with so many of life’s important decisions, the choice of red, curly, or black kale comes down to your taste, your personal preference, and your pocketbook

Curly kale has broad based deep green leaves and a robust, pungent, fully developed favor.  It is cultivated all year long and is easy to pick up in most supermarket chains.  Some cooks blanch the leaves first, while others add a grated carrot to the pan to soften and sweeten the somewhat bitter taste.

makes about 2 cups (500ml)

cost $6.00 for black kale / $3.00 for curly kale

calories 320

serves 2

160 calories per serving

More exotic and expensive are red kale (pictured on the right) and black kale (pictured on the left).  A little milder and a little less pungent, these kales can be found in green markets starting in fall through early winter and in specialty supermarkets all year long. My favorite is cavolo nero or black kale.  Alternatively called dinosaur or laciniato kale, this blackish-green leafy kale is favored by the Tuscans who have developed a special affection for its distinctive taste and gnarled appearance.  Chicken stock enhances flavor and a splash of balsamic vinegar or lemon juice before serving sharpens the flavor.  Check to be sure that excess stock or water has been completely evaporated so the final dish does not weep.

An excellent choice of greens to accompany a ham, a rack of pork, or a roast beef, keep kale in mind as you plan for the upcoming holidays.  Each pound (½ kilo) kale as purchased yields 2 to 2½ cups cooked.


2 bunches (15 ounces/430g) curly, red, or black kale, washed, stemmed, and chopped into medium sized pieces

2 tablespoons (25g) extra virgin olive oil

3 cloves (10g) fresh garlic, peeled and crushed

1 – 2 cups (250ml – 500ml) low sodium chicken stock

¼ teaspoon (.7g) flake salt

Lemon juice or Balsamic vinegar

Warm oil in sauté pan and soften crushed garlic.  Add kale a handful or two at a time using medium heat and stirring as you add each handful.  Sauté the kale until the pieces start to wilt and the oil is evenly distributed, usually about 5 minutes.  Add the salt and start adding stock or water a half cup (100ml) at a time.  Keep adding the stock until the kale is softened.  Keep heat high enough to evaporate each addition of stock.  If more liquid is required, use water.  Braise the kale for another 20 minutes.   Reduce the heat when the kale is softened and all liquid is absorbed or evaporated.  Adjust seasonings and finish with some lemon juice or balsamic vinegar.  At this point, the kale will hold nicely for at least 30 minutes.  Check before serving to be sure that excess stock or water has been completely evaporated so the final dish does not weep.

Note:  Both piece size and cooking time effect the texture of the final product.  The smaller the pieces or the longer the cooking time, the softer and smoother the kale.  Start with medium sized pieces and about 20 minutes, then adjust according to taste.


Kale is not cheap, but it is incredible healthy. MyPyramid classifies kale as a dark green vegetable and recommends 2 cups dark greens per week.   Whole Foods uses the ANDI (Aggregate Nutrient Density Index) to numerically rate foods and kale is on top with a score of 1000.  For those of you like me who love kale and are willing to pay the price, we get both flavor and nutrition with each bite.  The question I wrestle with is how to make this incredibly healthy vegetable appealing and acceptable to those of you who do not share my taste for slightly bitter greens.  I can’t guarantee success, but I know where to start.  A judicious amount of salt, a generous amount of fat, some acid, some culinary expertise, and a few discretionary dollars to invest in healthy greens.

Encouraging more people to eat and enjoy a healthy vegetable like kale is the best kind of healthy eating.  So I choose to focus more on the sourcing and cooking end and less on the limits to sodium and fat end.  To my simplistic mind, flexing a little on olive oil and salt makes good nutrition sense as long as more people eat more kale.


Per Serving (130g):  Calories 160, Fat 13g, Saturated Fat  2.0g, Sodium 240mg, Carbohydrate  8g, Fiber  2g, Protein  3g.  
A 2,000 calorie diet is used as the basis for general nutrition advice; however, individual calorie needs may vary.

Green Split Pea Soup

October is the month to pull out the soup pot.  Mine is made of bonded stainless steel, holds about 3 quarts (3 liters), and has been on the shelf since spring.  October days in New York are cool, crisp, and can be spectacularly beautiful.  Except when it rains.  And sometimes it rains a lot.  Either way makes good soup weather.  Bean based soups are easy to make but time consuming because beans require soaking time.  Quicker and just as satisfying are lentil and split pea soup.  Today it is going to be green split peas.  October is a good month for roots, bulbs, and tubers and no split pea soup would be complete without carrot, onion, and potato.  Some recipes call for ham hocks, pancetta, or bacon.  These are delicious, but my recipe works with just vegetables.  A freshly chopped garnish at the end, aromatics added during the cooking, and the right amount of salt are my flavoring agents of choice.   Yes, I use salt and I am going to tell you why.  But first the recipe.


1 pound (450g) dry split peas, rinsed, drained

2 small or 1 large yellow onion (250g) peeled, chopped

2 medium or 1 really big carrot (170g) peeled, chopped

1 potato (160g) scrubbed, quartered, eyes removed, skin intact

4 cups (1 liter) low sodium chicken stock, brick pack is fine

4 – 6 cups  (1 – 1 ½ liter) additional water

2 teaspoons Kosher style flake salt (7g)

Aromatics – thyme, oregano, garlic (optional)

Garnish – fresh scallion, fresh parsley, freshly ground black pepper

Put split peas into the soup pot, add potato, carrot, onion, stock, and water.  Bring to boil, partially cover, and gently simmer over low heat for about an hour or until the peas are completely soft.   Add salt and aromatics about half way through the cooking process.  Pass the soup through food mill.  Alternatively, blend using an immersion blender or an old fashioned stainless steel egg beater.  Add more water for a thinner soup and adjust seasoning.  Garnish with fresh cilantro, parsley, scallions, and black pepper.


makes about 12 cups (3 liters)   ●   total cost $5.00   ●   $1.70 per liter

portioning information   ●   150 calories per cup   ●   230 calories per bowl 

On to salt now.   Nothing is new about salt being controversial.  What is different this time around is the substance of debate.  Salt the mineral is tangible, visible, tactile, and real.  Sodium the element is elusive, conceptual, and measureable only by calculation or laboratory analysis.   Leaving aside the legitimate debate over health consequences of too much sodium, the measurement logistics are challenging.      

When the 2010 Dietary Guidelines are finally released later on this year, sodium recommendations will probably be set lower than under previous guidelines.  New York City formed a partnership at the beginning of 2010, the National Salt Reduction Initiative (NSRI), to guide a voluntary reduction of sodium levels in packaged and restaurant food by 2014.   Meanwhile, the restaurant and food industries continue the search for culinary salvation – a sodium free substitute  for salt.

As a cook, I love salt.  Powerful, robust, an exceptionally effective flavor enhancer, salt does the job.  Because of its strength, salt easily overwhelms other more delicate flavors so I have always used a light hand and treated salt with respect. 

Salt added in the proportions noted above meets current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria for low sodium and falls below the proposed 2014 target set by the NSRI guidelines for soup.  In fact the amount could be increased to just under 2 ¾ teaspoons flaked Kosher style salt and still meet both standards.  Serious cooks know that salting to taste is more a matter of personal preference than a function of software analysis.   Those of us who salt intuitively may need to be more attentive to tracking our use.  As sodium comes under increased scrutiny, our approach to measurement may benefit from analysis.  More to come on salt and sodium …


Nutrition Facts per 1 cup serving*  (240g):  Calories 140, Fat 0g, Saturated Fat  0g, Trans Fat  0g, Cholesterol  0mg, Sodium  230mg, Carbohydrate  24g, Fiber  8g, Protein  10g.  Vitamin A 40%, Vitamin C 10%, Calcium 2%, Iron 8%.  Excellent Source:  vitamin A as beta-carotene, fiber.  Good Source protein, thiamine, folate.
*Serving sizes are reference amounts defined and regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration).  A 2,000 calorie diet is used as the basis for general nutrition advice; however, individual calorie needs may vary.