Green Split Pea Soup

October is the month to pull out the soup pot.  Mine is made of bonded stainless steel, holds about 3 quarts (3 liters), and has been on the shelf since spring.  October days in New York are cool, crisp, and can be spectacularly beautiful.  Except when it rains.  And sometimes it rains a lot.  Either way makes good soup weather.  Bean based soups are easy to make but time consuming because beans require soaking time.  Quicker and just as satisfying are lentil and split pea soup.  Today it is going to be green split peas.  October is a good month for roots, bulbs, and tubers and no split pea soup would be complete without carrot, onion, and potato.  Some recipes call for ham hocks, pancetta, or bacon.  These are delicious, but my recipe works with just vegetables.  A freshly chopped garnish at the end, aromatics added during the cooking, and the right amount of salt are my flavoring agents of choice.   Yes, I use salt and I am going to tell you why.  But first the recipe.

THE RECIPE

1 pound (450g) dry split peas, rinsed, drained

2 small or 1 large yellow onion (250g) peeled, chopped

2 medium or 1 really big carrot (170g) peeled, chopped

1 potato (160g) scrubbed, quartered, eyes removed, skin intact

4 cups (1 liter) low sodium chicken stock, brick pack is fine

4 – 6 cups  (1 – 1 ½ liter) additional water

2 teaspoons Kosher style flake salt (7g)

Aromatics – thyme, oregano, garlic (optional)

Garnish – fresh scallion, fresh parsley, freshly ground black pepper

Put split peas into the soup pot, add potato, carrot, onion, stock, and water.  Bring to boil, partially cover, and gently simmer over low heat for about an hour or until the peas are completely soft.   Add salt and aromatics about half way through the cooking process.  Pass the soup through food mill.  Alternatively, blend using an immersion blender or an old fashioned stainless steel egg beater.  Add more water for a thinner soup and adjust seasoning.  Garnish with fresh cilantro, parsley, scallions, and black pepper.

THE METRICS

makes about 12 cups (3 liters)   ●   total cost $5.00   ●   $1.70 per liter

portioning information   ●   150 calories per cup   ●   230 calories per bowl 

On to salt now.   Nothing is new about salt being controversial.  What is different this time around is the substance of debate.  Salt the mineral is tangible, visible, tactile, and real.  Sodium the element is elusive, conceptual, and measureable only by calculation or laboratory analysis.   Leaving aside the legitimate debate over health consequences of too much sodium, the measurement logistics are challenging.      

When the 2010 Dietary Guidelines are finally released later on this year, sodium recommendations will probably be set lower than under previous guidelines.  New York City formed a partnership at the beginning of 2010, the National Salt Reduction Initiative (NSRI), to guide a voluntary reduction of sodium levels in packaged and restaurant food by 2014.   Meanwhile, the restaurant and food industries continue the search for culinary salvation – a sodium free substitute  for salt.

As a cook, I love salt.  Powerful, robust, an exceptionally effective flavor enhancer, salt does the job.  Because of its strength, salt easily overwhelms other more delicate flavors so I have always used a light hand and treated salt with respect. 

Salt added in the proportions noted above meets current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria for low sodium and falls below the proposed 2014 target set by the NSRI guidelines for soup.  In fact the amount could be increased to just under 2 ¾ teaspoons flaked Kosher style salt and still meet both standards.  Serious cooks know that salting to taste is more a matter of personal preference than a function of software analysis.   Those of us who salt intuitively may need to be more attentive to tracking our use.  As sodium comes under increased scrutiny, our approach to measurement may benefit from analysis.  More to come on salt and sodium …

 

Nutrition Facts per 1 cup serving*  (240g):  Calories 140, Fat 0g, Saturated Fat  0g, Trans Fat  0g, Cholesterol  0mg, Sodium  230mg, Carbohydrate  24g, Fiber  8g, Protein  10g.  Vitamin A 40%, Vitamin C 10%, Calcium 2%, Iron 8%.  Excellent Source:  vitamin A as beta-carotene, fiber.  Good Source protein, thiamine, folate.
*Serving sizes are reference amounts defined and regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration).  A 2,000 calorie diet is used as the basis for general nutrition advice; however, individual calorie needs may vary.

Salmon Salad with Vinaigrette Dressing

Summer is coming to an end.  The days are getting shorter.  A chill in the evening air means an end to summer salad suppers and the beginning of more robust meals.  But while summer is still here, a large salad is satisfying, refreshing, and takes about 30 minutes to put together as long as the greens are washed and ready to go.  For protein, I use both legumes and canned salmon.  Grilled chicken or canned tuna are good substitutes for the salmon.  Vegetable ingredients vary depending on what comes in and out of the market during the growing season, but my base always starts with mesclun.  I buy weekly from a vendor who lets me mix my own from the many offerings of multi colored, multi textured, slightly bitter leaves.  Proportions are for two people.  For robust appetites, serve with crusty bread.

THE RECIPE

½ cup (125 ml) olive oil and yogurt dressing, as per proportions below

7 tablespoons (100 g) canned chickpeas, rinsed, drained

¾ cup (50 g) red cabbage, washed, coarsely shredded

3 ½ cups (100 g) washed mesclun or assorted greens

1 medium (150 g) tomato, washed, cored, coarsely chopped

½ each (75 g) Haas avocado, peeled, seeded, sliced

1 – 6 ounce can (170 g) wild Alaskan pink salmon, canned, drained

Using a bowl with a 2 quart (2 liter) capacity, make a dressing in the bottom of the bowl with 4 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons white wine or sherry vinegar, 2 tablespoons 0% Greek yogurt, 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard, oregano, basil, pepper, and about 1/4 teaspoon flake salt.  Put chickpeas and cabbage in first, then mesclun, then tomato and avocado.  Other vegetable options are peppers, fennel, carrots, and cucumbers.  Arrange drained salmon on top.  Mix salad just before serving.

THE METRICS

makes about 6 ½ cups  ●  cost $12.20  ●  1070 calories

portioning information:   540 calories for 2 people  ●  270 calories for 4 people  ●  180 calories for 6 people

This salad delivers phytonutrient and fiber rich vegetables, mixed proteins, and oleic acid rich, omega-3 rich, vitamin E rich unsaturated fats.  Moreover, I used clean sustainable salmon and a seasonal heirloom tomato.  Despite these benefits, the salad cannot be labeled healthy because total fat exceeds acceptable parameters established by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Sodium and saturated fat also exceed acceptable parameters, but are easier to adjust in accordance with current regulations.

Before going back to school, I always made classic vinaigrette – three parts oil to one part vinegar.  My studies progressed, I learned about too much fat, and I stopped.  Experimenting with other combinations and substitutions became the goal.   For example, some variations on classic vinaigrette call for some crème fraîche and yogurt works really well.   I even tried fat free salad dressing once …   But the classic version kept calling me back because it makes such an elegant delicious product.

Let’s call it the olive oil dilemma.   The cook in me says enjoy the salad!  Just be careful the cold pressed extra virgin olive oil is what the label says it is.  The dietitian in me says maybe it is not quite that simple. The nutrient benefit is significant.  The three fat sources in question come from “good” fats and other options are out there.  I can run the numbers again adding bread with the meal or fruit and yogurt after the meal.    I can manage the impact over the day and plan according.  The dietician in me also knows that nutrition research is ongoing so I can continue to scan the literature for new perspectives on total fat in the diet and the value of good fats …

This summer I went classic and kept an eye on my daily calorie count.  And with summer coming to an end, I will not have to wrestle with the dilemma again until next year.

 

Nutrition Facts per ½ cup serving*  (g):  Calories 160, Fat 12g, Saturated Fat  1.5g, Trans Fat  0g, Cholesterol  10mg, Sodium  180mg, Carbohydrate  7g, Fiber  3g, Protein  7g.  Vitamin A 30%, Vitamin C 15%, Calcium 2%, Iron 6%.  Excellent Source vitamin A, vitamin B12.  Good Source vitamin C, protein, fiber, niacin, folate.  Natural Source omega-3 fatty acids.
*Serving sizes are reference amounts defined and regulated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration).  A 2,000 calorie diet is used as the basis for general nutrition advice; however, individual calorie needs may vary.